FIND YOUR COMMUNITY
April 15, 2019

6 Reasons to Stay Socially Active

Research has shown that social support and staying connected wards off the effects of stress on depression, anxiety and other health problems.(1)

Studies show that seniors who stay socially active and engaged experience a variety of benefits, including:

Better Cognitive Function

Social activities keep you sharp and mentally engaged, which is important to prevent the onset of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

Maintaining Good Emotional Health

Connecting with others helps you keep a positive mood, which in turn wards off depression.

Improving Physical Health

Socially active seniors tend to be more physically active. Plus, you tend to eat more and make better food choices when you eat with others.

Boosted Immune System

Studies show that seniors who stay engaged with others, and with life around them, demonstrate higher levels of immune-system function.

Enjoying Restful Sleep

If you have difficulty sleeping at night, it could be that you’re feeling isolated and lonely. Research shows that people who have more fulfilling relationships in their lives tend to sleep better than those who don’t.

Increased Longevity

Live a longer, happier life by keeping your social circle strong. Friends and loved ones help you deal with life’s daily stresses and often are key to encouraging you to live a healthier lifestyle.

Do you need to be more connected to others? Many times, it’s up to you to get motivated. Here is some motivation from one of Dr. Seuss’s beloved classics, Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

 Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Congratulations!

Today is your day.

You’re off to Great Places!

You’re off and away!

You have brains in your head.

You have feet in your shoes.

You can steer yourself

Any direction you choose.

You’re on your own. And you know what you know.

And YOU are the guy who’ll decide where to go.

Make, keep and strengthen connections in your life and—oh, the places you’ll go!

 

1Cohen, S. (2004). Social relationships and health. American Psychologist, 674-84

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